December, Panama, madness, road rage, traffic jams, inconsiderate drivers, emotional intelligence, cutting off, blocked intersections, blocking intersection

December Madness: Road Rage

Unfortunately, we are back in that time of  year when Panama’s road rage escalates and the traffic jams just seem to be crazy!  Everyone that has a car is out and about, and there does not seem to be a single day where there aren’t any traffic jams.  Obviously, Panama’s traffic in the central business district is pretty bad all year round – but December is nightmarish.

Every year, we see the government make the Corredor Norte & Corredor Sur (toll highways) free for some of the December period (often December 7 or 8 – Mother’s Day; and then again for Christmas – one year they made it free from the 19th to the 23rd!).  This is because some 2 million cars transit through Panama City every week.

It was so bad in 2016 that the Government changed the working hours of public offices so that they would leave work earlier and be able to get home before the worst of the traffic.  Hopefully this year it will be repeated, and we will see some employers offering alternative working hours to their staff to accommodate the Christmas traffic.

Road Rage

In Panama, all year round, it’s quite common to find drivers aggressively jumping queues, blocking intersections (even with the traffic cop directing the traffic), honking, flashing their lights, and speeding up to block you out as you try to change lanes or merge.  But this inconsiderate driving in bad traffic conditions seems to get worse in December.

What is essential to realise – while you cannot change or control how others respond & react in the traffic – you can control yourself! You can choose how you are going to view the problems around December traffic and stress.

Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence – something that many times appears to be sorely lacking in Panama – is the capacity to perceive, access & manage yourself and understand others.  It’s quite similar to empathy – with the added bonus of being self-aware.

It’s important to note – this is not intellectual.

This is intelligence.

It refers to our ability to learn – to continually change and adapt the information we had and then choose to respond differently.  One of the biggest challenges with emotional intelligence is that there is communication between the emotional and rational centres of our brain – and they occur at different speeds.

The lymbic system, which receives and processes a stimulus (leading to an emotional response), actually receives and processes faster than the neocortex (rational brain).  So, inevitably, we react emotional BEFORE we have had a chance to think.

road rage, just breathe, count to 10, Panama traffic, traffic jams, Christmas traffic, Costa del Este, Corredor Sur, Corredor Norte, Calle 50, Vía España, malls, Altaplaza, Multicentro, Multiplaza, Albrook

So, while it’s true that Panama needs to come up with new solutions to the December madness that leads to the road rage in the first place – there’s also a place for self-regulation!

Panama, traffric, road rage, Panama madness, Christmas traffic, December, Panama City, Calle 50, Vía España, Cinta Costera, Costa del Este

In  my ideal world of PanUtopia, all driver’s ed courses would include the following education:

  1. Pause & count to 10 —
    1. The brain struggles to process more than one thought at a time.  So you cannot count to 10 AND be thinking about why you are so mad at the other person.
    2. This allows the anger and emotions to dissipate until you can engage the rational brain
    3. Don’t take this frustration home with you – release & let go before you walk in the door!
  2. Engage your brain – think & visualize the consecuences of how you are planning to respond
  3. Practice empathy – recognise that they are driving in their own circumstances
  4. Defensive driving – not simjply driving according to the rules, but awareness that others might not be following the rules. It’s better to be safe than to be right.
  5. General education about timeliness – if there’s always bad traffic in Panama (and we all know that there is) – always calculate your travel time to the worse possible scenario, so that you are always on time.  It’s not the traffic’s fault you are running late.

Solutions

So, let’s really talk solutions to this December madness.

More public transport

I would love to see Panama actually start planning and announcing public transport options during the peak traffic.  To know that during the December traffic, there will be buses running more often than during the rest of the year.

And I would like to see Panamanians using public transportation more during the Christmas period:

  • metro
  • buses
  • Uber/taxi
  • Pedestrian

Carpooling

I would love for Panama to simply do away with their not-so-well and not-so-brilliant carpooling legislation! Who would think that legislating carpooling would actually work?

The problem is that in other countries a police officer will not pull you over in the morning traffic to find out whether the person(s) travelling with you in the car are friends/family or an officially carpooling which is registered… they will simply be glad for less traffic on the road.  However, in Panama, the taxis and transport unions are so strong, that they have made it impossible for anyone to give a neighbour or co-worker a lift to work – because apparently that’s unfair competition with the public transport sector!

Who in their right mind thought that this was a good idea?

If we want to address the traffic nightmare, we need to accept that maybe, perhaps, a neighbour will ask you for petrol-money!  And that’s okay.  It’s one less car on the road.  It’s not an illegal taxi service!

Changed working hours

In past years, the government has changed public offices working hours in December, in order to alleviate the congestion at peak hours.  This means that public officials were getting out of work by 3.30 p.m., allowing them to be home before 5.00 when the rest of private enterprise was getting off work.

More TV time – educational videos

I would love to see the transport authorities / police spend money on educational videos!

  • how to use a roundabout (circular intersections  – rotaries – what do you call them?)
  • reminder that a passing lane is for “passing” – go back into the right lane if you are not passing
  • give me a comedy about the rudeness of queue jumping
  • pet peeve – teaching drivers NOT to block intersections – don’t move forward into an intersection until it’s clear to exit.  And give this education, especially, to the traffic cops that are directing traffic.  Yes – even if you are directing traffic, there’s still no reason to allow ANY car to block the intersection!
  • tailgating versus defensive driving
  • purpose & uses of indicators – maybe another tongue-in-cheek comedy routine

But really – be safe as you are out there driving in the December madness.

Remember – while you have no control over how others are driving – you are 100% responsible for your own responses.  How will you choose to drive this December?

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Water: choose your words wisely

Growing up in Panama, in a little place called Tolé, I remember frequent water shortages. Now, it wasn’t that we didn’t have water around (there was a spring that never dried up even in summer and we had a pump), but we frequently had no running water. The town pump broke down, they turned it off, they were conserving electricity and so it wasn’t running. That was usually all summer long. I seem to recall spending more time waiting for the water to come on than having water!

garden-water-pumpIn a pretty typical summer, I spent a lot of time at the garden water pump, using a wheel barrow to carry 5 gallon tanks of water back to the house for chores, or showers, or washing the clothes. And if the town water supply went off for long enough, then we would go down to the spring with buckets to get drinking water. We didn’t drink the water from the well, because it wasn’t filtered.  But it was good enough for everything else.

I remember being conscientious in my use of water for showering, using the water from the washing machine to water the plants, and washing dishes in a bowl on the back porch. Even that water was thrown on the plants.  Carrying the water that we used made us judicious about how it was used.

Roll forward to 2018, March 22 – World Water Day – and we have a director of IDAAN standing before the national legislature alerting to the need to conserve water. Unfortunately, he chose his words badly. He failed to truly address the most basic of issues regarding water in Panama.  He would have fared much better if he had started his tirade addressing the need for education at all levels regarding water usage.

He didn’t.

He went straight to saying that the problem in Panama was the “marginal communities” who use plastic pools, purchased in Do It Center for $79.99, who empty their pools daily and misuse “all the water”. And he got roasted on social media for it!

  • He got roasted for saying they were marginal.
  • He got roasted for specifying plastic pools.
  • He got roasted for saying they were from Do It Center.
marginal02 marginal04 marginal01
If you don’t have a cement or tiled pool, “you’re marginal” Don’t be marginal, use balls! So if I buy my plastic pool in Novey’s and not in Do It Center… am I less “marginal”?

Memes abounded! And we all had a good laugh.

marginales03
“You are invited this Saturday, March 31, to the Marginal Pool Party. Invitation by IDAAN”

But, unfortunately, he failed to get any of his true message across or voice any concerns for a real issue that does need to be addressed: water conservation.  World Water Day, he has an invitation to address the national legislature to voice his concerns, and he blows it!

No one heard the message.

And there were people that got it – that understood that it was World Water Day and there was supposed to be a message about water conservation – and they tried to make their message heard.

They were drowned out by the “marginal memes”.

Every few years Panama has a water shortage at the end of our “dry season”. That usually means that it’s late March and rains are not expected until mid-May, and so we have restrictions for four to six weeks. April 2015 was the last one, and even that was not very serious.  Three times in the 20 years I’ve been living in Panama City.

It’s not a common problem.

And even then, they restricted air-conditioning use and asked everyone to be careful with their electricity consumption before they applied any measures to water usage.

We have two seasons: wet and dry. Or, as some like to call them “green season” and “summer”. Our average annual rainfall is between 76-91 inches (Panama City side) and about 130-170 inches on the Portobello side.  We live in a tropical climate, and have the only capital city in the world to have a tropical rain forest in the city (Metropolitan Park).

marginales06This year it was still raining in January. Our usual summer (starting mid-December) had not yet begun. We started the year with 15 days of solid rain.  So much so, that Gatun Lake, which feeds the Panama Canal was overflowing! I was staying at a friend’s on the lake, and the water was up over the sidewalk. Their floating dock was higher than the sidewalk!  They’ve never seen that before.

La precipitación de lluvias acumulada del 1 al 17 de enero de 2018 es de 245 milímetros. Es 427% por encima del promedio histórico en la Cuenca del Canal.
Los reservorios multipropósitos nos permitirían acumular esta agua para la temporada seca.

— Jorge Luis Quijano (@jorgelquijano) January 19, 2018

According to the Director the Panama Canal (Jorge Quijano), the rainfall from January 1st to 17th this year was 245 mm.  That was 427% higher than the average for the entire history of the Canal.

This water is stored in the extra flooded areas that allow it to be stored for dry seasons to come.

But that was only this year.

A few years back there was concern that we might go a whole year without a proper rainy season, getting only occasional showers, rather than rain from May through November.

At the beginning of March, National Geographic published an article regarding Cape Town running out of water, and having a quick look at what other capital cities or major cities might be next.

Why Cape Town is running out of water, and who’s next?

Cape Town is considering a future of water shortages – “a water scarce future“.

A 40% water deficit is expected worldwide by 2030.  5 bn are expected to be affected by 2050.  But we don’t have to go very far: a little bit north and we get to Mexico with water shortage problems. A little further to the south and we have Lima, Peru with severe water shortage problems.  Unlike Panama City, which is in a rich tropical basin, Lima sits on a desert, which is the 2nd driest capital in the world.

Here in Panama, we take the issue of water with a pinch of salt. Living happily in a “dream world”, far removed from the possibility or any planning for what could happen if for just one year we got scattered showers, rather than proper tropical rain. Reforestation is simply an immigration program, rather than a way of life or requirement for development.  There is no real effort made even to reforest along the banks of the rivers and lakes that supply our city supplies.  Instead, we have rolling, grassy hills.  Water that simply evaporates because it is unprotected.

And then, when it rains too much, we complain that the water treatment plant got shut down because it got clogged up with mud (because there were no trees to hold the erosion back).

To add insult to injury, we have faulty maintenance that leaks water all over our streets.

rosita-waterbubblingup

So, yesterday, for example, the water got turned off for a couple of hours while the road was dug up and the water supply pipes were fixed.  Now, these pipes could be over 100 years old – I know the street was there before the church was built. And in 2014 the church celebrated 100 years of being founded and 2026 it celebrates 100 years of being completed as it is today.  But that wasn’t the only wastage yesterday.

There were numerous other reports around town of broken pipes gushing clean water into the streets.

 

Water just wasting away.

So while the director of IDAAN is complaining about all those “marginal communities” that are misusing the water in their plastic pools, the water is simply spilling into the streets in various parts of town from lack of maintenance and an adequate prevention plan.

Unfortunately, for 2018, the opportunity for a real discussion about the importance of water on World Water Day was lost. And I don’t see this director of IDAAN finding an audience willing to listen to him in the near future. That opportunity to make a significant difference was lost by a few misplaced words at the beginning of his presentation!