Panama, traffic jams, car, cars, transport, network, train, metro, bus, buses, quality, life, work, employment, jobs, commute, commuting, driving, riding, stuck

Traffic jams

It’s 4.44 a.m. and I am awake with my hot chocolate. This, for me, is quite a normal time to be awake and up.  But that’s just my body clock – that loves getting up hours before dawn to welcome the day!  I love the quiet morning – no interruptions – just to sit and write.

Most Panamanians, however, have a waking time similar to this – with alarm clocks and a commute that I do not envy!  One friend tells me she leaves home before 5.50 a.m., otherwise she will be stuck in traffic for 2 hours.  If she leaves before then, it only takes 30 minutes.  So, she gets to work at 6.30 a.m. every morning!  But it’s better to be at work than stuck in traffic for hours!

Another lady in my office leaves home (Chorrera) every day before 5.20, so that she has a “hope” of getting on the unlicensed buses (known here as bus pirata), because at least then she can come with air-conditioning and sitting down.   All in order to get to the office before 8.00 a.m.  Most people that live in Chorrera are awake at 4.00 a.m. to get to work by 8.00 – to me that is simply unimaginable!

It’s quite normal for a Panamanian to spend 4 to 5 hours a day stuck in traffic on their way to and from work!  Imagine the quality of life they could have if they could recover 3-4 hours a day!

While it’s true that the Metro train runs from Los Andes to Albrook Mall in 20 minutes, that’s only a partial solution to Panama’s commuting problem!  Panama has built suburbs in three directions:

  1. Los Andes / Milla 8 / San Miguelito
  2. Tocumen / Pacora / 24 de diciembre
  3. Arraijan (pop. 300,000)  / Chorrera (pop 200,00)

Of these three areas, the current metro line only services the first of these.  The second metro line – under construction but “almost finished” will cover Tocumen, 24 de diciembre & Pacora – but will not actually go to the airport!  So, for now, we can forget about the option of coming into the airport and just catching the metro home!  Once again, I see no plans for any parking at the final station.

And the third line of the metro – that will take care of commuters from Chorrera & Arraijan, is still in planning phases – with the largest part of the plan being the bridge across the Canal for the train & more traffic.  Chorrera and Arraijan used to be in the same Province as Panama City – until the populations grew so much, that the west side of the bridge was divided off into a new province: Panamá Oeste.  Chorrera is now the capital of that province!  But it doesn’t “act” like a provincial capital in many ways.  It continues in its role of sleeping & housing satellite for Panama City.

As Ursula Kiener stated earlier this year in a tweet – building 20 bridges across the Canal isn’t going to solve the problem – the issue lies with having Chorrera & Arraijan simply as dormitory cities.  We need to start developing the rest of the country and creating jobs there.

But even if I look at New Zealand – and their commuting problem for Auckland’s central business district – is it really all that different? Twelve KM from New Lynn to CBD in about an hour – which is half the distance that commutes have from Tocumen or a third from Chorrera (34km) into Panama City’s CBD.

Panama attempts to solve the commuting issue by having all of the lanes of the Interamerican highway coming INTO town from 4.00 to 8.00 a.m. – meaning that if you want to go out of Panama City, you take the Puente Centenario!

Basic culture – driving:

And that’s without even talking about the traffic in downtown Panama City!  Unfortunately, Panamanians do not appear to have learned the basics of how to handle intersections – exacerbating the traffic jams and frustration for other drivers.

What’s worse — you watch the traffic cops telling drivers to pull up over the intersection while they wait in line… doing nothing to help in the education of drivers who are respecting an intersection.

 

Pet peeve # 2 – Panamanians do not seem to have learnt the correct way to use a roundabout!  Panama would be a slice closer to Utopia, if every driver would just follow the simple etiquette and rules for using a roundabout.

Part of the solution lies in a complete education of Panamanians regarding regard to the driving rules – not driving on the shoulder and creating a third lane when there are only two, not driving down a one-way street the wrong way to avoid the queue in the other street, and respect for fellow drivers.  Everyone is heading the same direction – getting to work.

Transport solutions

Public transport

The options in Panama at the moment are limited:

  1. Buses, including metro buses & “piratas” – referring to the unlicensed buses that run daily (who when they are deemed illegal actually protest and block the roads)
  2. Metro system – line 1 – running North-South – only available at the moment from San Isidro to Albrook Mall
  3. Taxis – which used to be relatively safe and comfortable – are now often not air-conditioned and people are concerned about their safety
  4. Uber & other apps – a better option, as long as you have a credit card for payment, since they are phasing out cash payments (although in today’s headlines – this is being extended again)
  5. Walking
  6. Cycling

I don’t know anyone in Panama that would cycle to work – especially since upon arriving at work they would need somewhere to shower.  The heat & humidity of the tropics does not make this a cool morning ride to work – and the fumes from the traffic are asphyxiating!  Not to mention the complete lack of cycle-friendly cars that would push you off the road in their angst to get to work “on time”.

Uber & taxis are certainly not options for a long commute – such as from Chorrera or Pacora, because they would break a hole in your pocket if you did that daily!

And so commuters are left only with walking (fine for short distances as long as there isn’t a tropical downpour), buses or their private vehicles.

Car-pooling or ride sharing

Car-pooling would seem like one obvious solutions to Panama’s public transport crisis more than one person travels in a car, and prevents the need for others to have to drive  themselves. Ride-sharing reduces each person’s travel costs such as: fuel costs, tolls, and the stress of driving.

While to me it may seem crazy – Panama prohibits carpooling or ride-sharing to work – unless you’ve registered for it!  The taxis and public transport didn’t want people to be able to do this, because they said that the driver would charge others for the ride (i.e. gas money) and that was taking money out of the pocket of public transport.

Really?

Seriously?

Would you LOOK at the transport problem that Panama has?

And you want to legislate carpooling & ride-sharing so that it’s done properly???

While every other country simply has a rule that there are carpooling lanes (i.e. if there are two or more people in a car they get a special fast lane) – Panama is sitting here complaining about the traffic problem without really solving it!

Rant over.

Parking for at Metro Stations

One of my pet peeves is the LACK of parking at the final metro stations – I’m talking Pacora (when they finish line 2), San Isidro (out past Los Andes) and whatever the plans are for the last station in Chorrera.  I understand that there is no parking at the station on Vía España or even San Miguelito’s “La Gran Estación”.

But I don’t understand the lack of planning of not ending the final station with a car park, so people can drive to the station, leave their car and hop on the train! So you don’t want to have security looking after the cars? Put a sign up – “leave cars at your own risk”.

But the reality of Panama’s situation – especially in a country where it rains 8-10 months of the year – people need a way to get from their home to the train station.  How do we expect commuters to get from their homes (often in suburbs and gated communities) to the train station to start the commute? They are not going to pay a taxi and most likely not going to walk 3 km to the train station!

Implementing solutions

While I agree that it would be fabulous if some of the companies and jobs were available in Chorrera, rather than everyone commuting into Panama City – I don’t realistically see that happening within the short term.

Headquarters for multinationals are already “out of town” – in the sense that they are not central business district – either in Panama Pacifico, ciudad del Saber or Costa del Este. Processing zones are constantly being developed in Don Bosco, Tocumen and Transistmica – areas which are highly industrial and strategically located for logistics between Colon and the airport.

But Panama needs to find that perfect mix between investing more heavily in public transport (buses, not just the metro) and offering commuters options of how to get from their homes onto the public transport network.  They need to make sure that walking to a bus stop is actually an option, not an obstacle course.  I am constantly amazed at how sidewalks simply “end”, leaving you in the middle of an overgrown or muddy patch of mire.

There has been a lot of criticism these last two years about how the walking infrastructure (foot paths & walkways) has taken away what little parking there was in the central business district.  Not to mention the horrendous flooding that badly planned and executed works have caused!  The current river flowing down Vía Argentina each time it rains has become a sad parody of  wake-boarding!

That aside – if we really want to improve the quality of life for Panamanians – we need to accept that public transport is what will provide that.  This means more trains & a metro system that allows people to get home within 30-40 minutes, rather than 2 hours, more buses (especially shorter routes that go through neighbourhoods) and taxis or Uber.

If we are going to go with more public transport – Panama needs bus stops that actually keep the water out when it’s raining – not tiny little roofs for a spring shower!  And the public foot paths need to be walkable – rather than dangerous obstacle courses!

Building more roads (corredores or bridges across the Canal) will not solve the problem – this requires a change of culture & expectations.  And this means – the solution will take a generation to re-educate!

So – when do we start?

 

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Panama politicians, politics, promises, electoral promises, needs, community, communities, identify, coach, coaching

Promises Panama needs

Last week I published a post regarding my “wish list” for Panamanian politicians – what I wanted them to demonstrate in their character – compassion, creativity & courage.

André Conte responded that while he enjoyed it, more than “what do you want” he wanted the question to address “what do we all need?”

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So, while I’m not entirely sure that I have managed to truly answer his question, here is my attempt at responding to the issues that I think our 2019 elected politicians need to seriously address.

Many of these issues will not fall upon the legislators to respond – but rather upon the President, Cabinet, individual Ministers and heads of Government Departments.

Some will require incredible courage, such as the head of the Caja de Seguro Social – a crisis which I have been hearing about the past 25 years. And yet, it’s still in crisis! The leadership required here is one of an appointee – not an elected official!

And yet, here’s hoping that they step forward with compassion – the ability to connect to all the interested parties; creativity – to be able to draw upon all the solutions from all interested parties to solve the crisis; and courage – to confront the many interests that arise and actually implement a solution after having heard all interests, identified the needs of the institution and the public, and work to a long-term solution for the institution once and for all.  I maintain my opinion that every single politician and director or Minister needs coaching & mentoring in order to truly be effective in their roles with adequate support!

What I’ve seen of politicians so far

Unfortunately, my opinion of politicians is not very favourable.

It’s my belief that they are driven by their need for “job security” – which means that they are looking solely for reelection (to the same post or a “better” one), rather than driven by the needs of their communities.

Typically, this means that they are always looking for a building or project with their name on it – it’s irrelevant whether the community really needed it or not. They want something that they can point to and say “look what I did for you”.  Most constituents will look at that and think “wow, they built something”, without actually asking whether that was the priority of the community.

Bureaucrats, similarly, are driven by promotion & job security. This means that they will not do anything risky – even if change is needed – because that could get you fired. Likewise, in a situation of cronyism, they are unlikely to oppose elected politicians, because that will get you fired.  This means that they will simply toe the line – even if the line isn’t going anywhere!

Community interests & needs

Unfortunately, this typically means that neither the elected politicians nor the bureaucrats are studying the interests of the communities that they serve. And moreover, it means that no one is thinking or evaluating the long-term needs of the community or society as a whole.

For some areas of Panama’s political plans, I am aware that there have been agreements reached between political parties & bureaucrats regarding long-term plans. But this is the exception, rather than the rule.  Unless politicians are willing to give up their aspirations for reelection – focusing instead on the long-term needs of society, instead of a building with their name on it or hams for Christmas – what will be done?

How will projects actually be completed if there is not complete “buy-in” from all interested parties? Solutions that are reached by the different interest groups – and not simply decided by politicians with a 5-year plan.  This is one of the primary reasons why I will harp on, over and over, about the need for compassion (connection), creativity (the ability to brainstorm with all interested parties solutions – outside the box), and courage (motivation to move forward and overcome obstacles that arise along the way) for the leaders in driving a solution forward!

Because – if for once – someone were able to get all of the interest parties to agree upon the solution, which takes longer than 5 years to implement – it wouldn’t matter that the government changes.  The interest groups themselves would keep the projects and solutions on track through the change of government. But I haven’t seen a government yet capable of pulling off a solution of this magnitude!

So, what do I think we need?

Where do I start?  Which of all of the needs of Panama is clamouring the most for attention?  If we solved one of the problems, would that solve all the rest?  I know that O’Neill in Alcoa found a keystone problem, which when he solved then solved by itself all the rest of the problems within the company, but I am really hesitant to take a guess which one of the areas of government might have the biggest impact on all the rest of the areas!

Presidency

For want of a better place to start, I will start at the top!  And I will admit – this being PanUtopia – the size of the issues to be addressed overwhelms me as to who the right person for this job might be.  Because, in utopia… this person would be capable of handling a Cabinet of Ministers and keeping each one of them, and their respective subordinates, focused on the goals at hand and putting each of the areas I will touch upon in order!

Qualities I want in a President:

  1. compassionate – able to connect with empathy and understanding with communities and their leaders; able to connect with each member of the Cabinet and empower them to effectively do their jobs, because it’s not the President’s job to fix each of the problems that I will identify below; diplomatic – able to command a room and speak from the heart, capturing the attention and connecting with the audience;
  2. creative – able to sit down at a table with 15 people + assistants, and brainstorm solutions – calling in all the talents & abilities of those present – to create solutions that no one person individually could possibly come up with; analytical & logical – able to look through the numbers and lists and come up with priorities and rationally decide the most efficient course of action; well-read & educated – to learn from the experiences and draw from the experience of others that are not even in the room through extrapolation;
  3. courageous – secure enough in their identity to speak their truth and present their ideas and solutions; motivated to see the solution through any obstacles, knowing from the very beginning that obstacles would arise and that they would need to create solutions for those, and being willing to do the hard work consistently to see it through to completion.  Motivated to push through the days when things appear to be going wrong, not simply waiting until “things feel right”.

Looking at that list… it’s kind of what I want in every Minister & Director of Government Agencies as well!  It’s not enough that it only be at the level of the President!

As you will see from the issues below – many of these issues are actually in the hands of bureaucrats – Ministers appointed by the President (not publicly elected officials) and heads of Departments.  While there will be necessary work with publicly elected officials (mayors, representatives and legislators), the majority of “decision making” and implementation will be effectively be within the executive branch of government!

How important is it, over the next 5 years, to legislate in theses matters (other than budget constraints) versus implementation of the decision-making?

Education

Unfortunately, earlier this year I wrote about the challenges facing Panama’s education system, and many of those challenges are still unattended.  Of the 1300+ schools without walls (just the roof held up on posts), there are more than 700 still outstanding. In a recent study of the 3rd grade education level, 1/3 can’t write, 50% can’t read and 60% don’t have requisite basic math skills expected!  That’s without even addressing the issues of modernisation of the system to meet the constantly changing global climate and advances in technology and work environments!

The biggest challenge, however, that I see — what is the vision that guides Panama’s education policies? How will the Minister of Education reach consensus with the educators and other interested parties (including even future employers and entrepreneurship opportunities) to establish the road map that will guide decision making in coming years?  What is the first and primary issue that should be dealt with in the education system that would work towards solving the myriad of issues that need to be faced: preparation of the teachers, infrastructure, participation in growth of the economy, technology?

This one area alone requires someone at its head that truly can get to the bottom of the issues within the Ministry and set a plan of action with the buy-in of the teachers & educators to achieve at least one phase of the plan by 2024!

Health

While I accept that the health issues are actually 2 separate issues, one being the Ministry of Health (and approval of imports of medication, as well as the State health network), there is the more pressing crisis of the CSS (Social Security).  This is a challenge from within as well as from the outside!  The competing interests are tearing it apart, as they have been doing for the past 30+ years!

There are issues regarding their finances & assets, issues with respect to the services (or failure) offered, the infighting and power struggles (national as well as regional and within hospitals), and the competing interests of the doctors, nurses, technicians, suppliers & patients.

This is definitely a scenario where I could see the identification of keystone habit (such as that described by O’Neill in his experience at Alcoa) would actually make a monumental difference to the whole organisation and could be the beginning of a solution!  However, O’Neill was lucky that he counted with the support of his Board – the ones responsible for bringing him on to solve the problem!  In the case of the CSS – this need for support from the Board would need to be addressed!

Housing

Panama currently faces the challenge of needing 200,000+ housing units – but the construction industry is faced with rising labour & material costs.  Construction permits dropped 50% in 2018, and while the country needs 15-16,000 additional homes each year, only some 14-15,000 a year were being built (before the drop in permits!).  Of the 100,000 homes promised by the current government during their term, some 45,000 have been built.

The head of housing will need to balance the interests & needs of the community (for housing) against those of the construction companies, infrastructure needs, and environmental concerns.

Infrastructure

Closely related to the need for housing are other infrastructure needs – even though in 2018-2019 some $2 billion of projects are underway.  This includes finishing line 2 of the Metro and starting line 3 to Arraijan & Chorrera.  But one of the questions being regularly asked is why Chorrera is merely a satellite of Panama City, rather than being designed and built as a separate center that provides employment and not merely sleeping quarters to workers for Panama City!

Two thousand km of roads were promised by the government and claimed to have been built, although it was later clarified that this was really only some 355 km that were completed.

The government also promised to eradicate latrines – but while 200,000 were promised, the results remain unknown.  Likewise, running water has not been installed to all communities in Panama, and many communities still find themselves off the electric grid and mobile phone coverage.

Energy

Closely related to the foregoing issues are the myriad of issues tied up in the energy sector.  I wrote about these issues a number of months ago.  The interest groups here are varied and with conflicting interests.  Needs include:

  • a long-term maintenance plan
  • transmission line #4
  • pricing
  • environmental policies and policing.

The sectors that are affected by energy include: construction, commerce, industry & consumers.

If Panama wants 75% renewable energy by 2050, it needs to change the legal framework and confront the investments recently made into gas-based energy projects, rather than green energy projects such as wind farms or solar power.  In 2016, 60% of the electricity produced in Panama was through hydroelectric plants (which while a renewable source, create significant environmental damage in large areas), 32% thermal, 7% wind and only 1% solar.  What is curious to note is that worldwide, countries with much less sunshine (take for example – Germany) have a much higher rate of solar power than our tropical nation!  Go figure!

Fiscal Policy

Panama’s current fiscal policy requires an overhaul – in order to:

  1. attract investment
  2. be fair on all the players in the market (including small & medium enterprises)
  3. tax monies should not be “lost” through poor management and corruption/theft
  4. in order to “balance the books” – decisions may need to be made to cut government overhead
  5. it may be necessary to down-size government offices, irrespective of how unpopular that may make government members!

Economy

Where to start?

Panama currently faces more unemployment, less investment, less loans being granted and less sales in commerce.  In 2018, the unemployment rate increased for the fifth consecutive year.

There is a serious lack of equality within the country, with many areas still in subsistence farming and well below the poverty line.  Only a few sectors are actually benefited by the current economic growth that is touted internationally.

Financing is barely available for the business sector, particularly small to medium enterprises.  Policies do not support or encourage growth, investment or expansion of companies.

Unemployment

Forty percent of the workforce is currently listed as “self-employed”, “on contract” or “part time” – with no stability.  The results in lower productivity and inability to participate in bank financing and other needs.

Special Zones

While the special zones were thriving, with global changes, they are failing to create a significant difference to the economy and generate employment. Policy changes and focus are necessary.

Tourism

While tourism generates about 10% of GDP and 130,000 jobs in the economy, hotels are currently suffering with a 46% occupancy rate. Once again, a concerted plan and creativity – from public and private sector together – is required to change the situation.

Agriculture

It would appear that the agricultural sector has been abandoned to subsistence farming – with not much technological or educational assistance to the sector.  Exceptions to this are the farms owned and operated by the major supermarkets, who basically produce exclusively for their own consumption.  But many areas of the country are abandoned, with little or no interest in exchanges of technology between countries and participation in projects for learning in the alienated communities that are relegated to subsistence.

Another concern, in the commercial enterprises of farming, is long-term sustainability and environmental accountability for farming methods – particularly long-term effects of runoff from the farms and damage to the surrounding environment.

Justice & Security

I can’t close without mentioning the concerns about the justice system and security issues in Panama.  There are many jokes and memes about “perception” – we “perceive” that there is a problem.  But let’s get real – there is a problem! Not a perception!

Security of citizens and tourists needs to be addressed not only in Panama City or Colon, but in the entire country. Gangs & drug trafficking need to be addressed, as do home invasions and robberies.

In the justice system, attention should be given to the Sistema Penal Accusatorio – which was introduced over the past few years.  It’s not that the system should be reverted to the previous system, which was full of its own flaws – but attention needs to be given to the concerns of the police force and prosecutors regarding their experience within the system. These concerns needs to be addressed across the board.

  • What needs to be fixed?
  • What simply needs to be tweaked?
  • How can members of the police force be educated and prepared better to work within the system?
  • Where are different parties frustrated by the process?

Change is never comfortable, but concerns should also be addressed.

Drawing this to a close

As I look at all of these needs, I recognise that Panama needs well-prepared teams within each area.  This is not an issue for “the President” to fix. I admit, I am sick of people saying “The President needs to come here and solve this problem”.  A country’s problems cannot depend solely on one person to solve them!

This is something that will require not just Ministers that are prepared to sit down at tables, but all interest groups that are well-versed in the myriad of issues and concerns of their specific industry and that are open to brain-storming solutions that take into account all of the interests in the matter, rather than simply being closed to “this is my position”.

Experienced negotiators and mediators – that are able to delve into the needs and interests of all parties will be required at each table – that can identify the need that lies below the stated position.  People that know how to ask questions and are willing to continue asking until truly connecting with the source of the interest, rather than accepting on face value a projected position at the negotiating table.

If any one of these problems is truly to be addressed and a solution found – all parties have to be prepared to see all sides of the issue and begin to accept that the solution may only truly be found by everyone working together to build a better country!

Communities themselves will need to start to believe that they possibly have a role to play in solving the problem, and actually in carrying the solution into effect.

This may require that everyone stops looking at their belly button and “what’s in it for me?” – and actually starts to look at

“how do we all participate in fixing these problems?”

Well, as always, this is PanUtopia!

Jesus, Panama, children, religious community, abortion, gay marriage, family values, Utopia, churches, healing, communities, love Thy neighbour, love thy neighbor, organised religion, Catholicism, politics, political parties, followers, evangelists, televangelists

Panama – Utopia – a religious community where Jesus might actually be welcome

“What if Panama had 0% corruption, no inflated government contracts and politicians were actually elected for their capacity and ability to get the job done? What if public sector officials actually did their work with heart and soul? What if private citizens and companies practiced social responsibility? What if neighbours worked together to build better neighbourhoods and participated actively in local government?

What if churches fed the poor and provided social and emotional healing to their communities?”

Panama doesn’t have Jesse Duplantis, wanting his $54M jet, but it has its fair share of “rockstar” evangelists.   Like the one that rides in a helicopter over Panama City to “bless it”.  His critics suggest that Jesus would have walked around the city to impart his blessing on everyone, not flown over in a helicopter.

These same evangelists would create a new political party, calling on all of their members to only vote for those who are sanctioned by the church.  They call on their members to protest “for family values” against gay marriage.  And then, they are strangely silent on issues like rape of minors and the 9,000+ adolescent pregnancies from last year. They are vociferous in their rejection of sex ed in schools, because it would compromise a family’s right to teach this in the home, but are silent with respect to real social solutions.

They are likewise nonvocal on corruption, the investigation of Obredecht bribes, and the slow justice system in Panama which never seems actually convict anyone other than the poor.  They say that with a new political party they want to drive change, but there are some things that they just don’t seem to want to change! If they can amass 10,000+ for a family values march, why not bring all of those members to a march against corruption?

While claiming to draw the community closer together and working together  to protest against same-sex marriage, they are separatist on so many other matters.  In 2019 Panama will be host to World Youth Day, a week long convention of youth in Panama organised by the Catholic Church.  It is expected that the Pope will attend. This event is thought to cost some $50M to organise here, and while the Baha’i, Methodist, Anglican & even Muslim communities have expressed their support, including housing the youth in their places of worship or homes, support from the evangelical community has once again been soundless, other than Salvation Army and other groups that are very youth-focused.

Would these be religious communities where Jesus might actually feel welcome?

Am I being tongue in cheek? Hell, yes!

I am so sick of watching churches say that they support “family values” and yet do nothing when there is a case of a minor having been abused for 8 years by a family member.  There were no protests when he received a sentence of community service, which isn’t allowed under the criminal code.  “That’s a problem for the justice system”. It obviously has nothing to do with “family values”.

There are likewise no “family value” issues in teen pregnancies, and God forbid that we have sex ed in schools.  Abstinence, taught in homes, is certainly the only way to stave off the rising cases of HIV, STDs and unwanted pregnancies.  What about all those youth whose families are not teaching anything at home?  Should they simply receive whatever education their families see fit?

Adolescent mothers, most of a certain social strata, aren’t provided with a staunch support network to help them through their pregnancies, stay in school, and other basic skills to help them break the poverty cycle.  Now, there are fabulous programs like “Las Claras”, run by the women’s group “Voces Vitales”.  But this is run by a group of professional women concerned to improve the opportunities for young women as single mothers.  This is not something that churches in Panama have seen as an “outreach program” or a social need to address.

There are also programs, like Asociación Luz y Vida, which runs a home for the elderly in Paraíso (and another in Metetí, Darien), most of whom were homeless.  This was started by Monseñor Rómulo Emiliani and then set up as a Nonprofit, with a group of donors.  Even so, it only has space for 50 elderly patrons.

Another program was established by the Catholic church in cooperation with the City Council: “Centro de Orientación y Atención Integral San Juan Pablo II“, in which the Catholic church undertakes to take on at least 30 people a month referred to it by the City Council social workers.  This is an attempt to work together at solving a problem of homelessness and drug addiction, but requires that the participants want to be rehabilitated.  The City Council, will, however, subsidize the program with $36,000 a year towards expenses ($3,000/month).

There is also a program under way in San Miguelito (probably the most dangerous part of Panama City, that is actually outside of the city limits), which addresses the gang wars.  In this program, some 200 evangelical groups and 60 Catholic churches joined task forces to reach 1,500 youth in a program aimed at getting them out of gangs and into “the Life University”, in which they would be taught life skills, sports & hand-crafts of various types.

But, with the exception of Las Claras (not associated with any church) and Asociación Luz y Vida (a nonprofit that I know was originally the brainchild of Monseñor Emiliani), which I already knew about, I had to search long and hard to discover the social programs that the churches in Panama were participating in! For example, when I looked up Hosanna Social Programs, the results that I got from the search engines were all about their television programs and shows!  They do, however, have a prison outreach program.

What happened to Jesus’ call to love your neighbour as yourself:

35 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, 36 I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’ (Matthew 25)

This makes me truly wonder if Jesus would feel at home with the churches in Panama today?

Or would he be walking through their houses of worship, overturning tables and throwing out the money changers and all of those seeking to make a business of the church?

It’s not that I don’t want to see churches in Panama, but in a Utopia, churches would be so much more than inward looking social clubs only concerned about their ratings and attendance numbers!